Teen Suicide – How Adults Can See the Signs and Prevent the Sorrow

Episode 1

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In the first in a two-part series on teen suicide, Roy confronts the epidemic of teenage suicide in the United States, beginning with a detailed examination of those mental health disorders that are most associated with suicidal tendencies. Roy also addresses the active and passive types of suicidal tendencies and explains the importance of viewing suicide from a mental health perspective instead of a moral one.

Finally, Roy shares the warning signs that signal a teen or other young person may be suffering from those mental health disorders that may lead to suicide. Roy also offers practical steps that adults can take if they suspect a teen or young person they know is considering suicide.

Roy encourages adults working with young people to take advantage of the resources offered by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention or AFSP. The AFSP’s website can be found here and features a wide variety of resources helpful in addressing suicide as well as contact information for local ASFP charters. If you or someone you know is in crisis, you can reach the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HELLO to 741-741.

Episode 2

If you’re reading this on your mobile device or blog update email, click here to listen to the podcast.

In this episode, Roy continues discussing the epidemic of teenage suicide by focusing on what adults can do when they recognize the signs that indicate a young person is contemplating suicide. Roy encourages adults to broach the subject with teens by first asking permission to discuss the issue, which allows teens to feel a measure of trust and security with the adult. Even resistant teens will be inclined to at least listen to what an adult has to say about suicide using this method.

Roy stresses that adults working with or parenting teens must understand that broaching the subject of teen suicide does not cause it to happen, but rather, exposes it to healthy discussion and most often, prevention. Roy explains that adults must work through their own discomfort to help reach today’s teens, who are struggling with tremendous anxiety and stress. These struggles, Roy points out, are not getting any easier or diminishing for teens and are to blame for the high rate of teen suicide today.

Roy encourages adults working with young people to take advantage of the resources offered by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention or AFSP. The AFSP’s website can be found here and features a wide variety of resources helpful in addressing suicide as well as contact information for local ASFP charters. If you or someone you know is in crisis, you can reach the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HELLO to 741-741.

 

January 19, 2017